Pēke

Pehiaweri Marae is a traditional gathering place made up of historical buildings, beautiful whēnua, rākau and wetlands located in Glenbervie, Whangarei.

In 1885 the Pehiaweri whānau gifted Pehiaweri whēnua, consisting of eight acres, to the Church of England to hold in trust for use as a church, vicarage and burial ground. The Whare Karakia (church) was built in 1886, and stands in the urupa (cemetery), among our tupuna and beside our distinctive oak trees.

The vicarage (the Manse) was also established on marae grounds during this time. This was the home of the Anglican pastor and his family, who took care of and ran the church in their residency. In later years, the Manse became the home of some Pehiaweri Marae whānau. Many wonderful memories of the old Manse are still reminisced upon today.

In 1980 the land was officially returned to the whānau, following a Private Members Bill, when a large portion of whānau attended in solidarity. The name of our Wharenui was named after this hui: ‘Te Reo o Te Iwi”.

After the land was returned, major fundraising took place and a building programme was established. Funds in excess of $300,000 were generated to build our marae. The raising of funds seen that our Wharenui, “Te Reo O Te Iwi”, Wharekai, “Te Reo O Te Ora”, and the ablutions block were built during 1987-1992.

Pehiaweri Marae has a diverse range of use and currently, over 10,000 people come to our marae each year. Our marae has won awards for its health projects and is seen as a progressive organisation supporting a range of cultural, social, health, sport, and local needs throughout the region.

Pehiaweri whānau pride themselves on their reputation for fine hospitality, a lively spirit and inclusiveness of all peoples.